Copyright © 2018 American Chemical Society
 

March 12, 2018 Issue

Volume 96, Issue 11
09611-cov-cover
March 12, 2018 Issue, Vol. 96 | Iss. 11
Making a flu vaccine that will last longer than a season is a dream scientists have been chasing for years. Here’s how they’re working to make it a reality
By Bethany Halford
(pp. 42-47)
Features
Government & Policy
EPA ramps up efforts to create high-throughput approaches for screening chemical effects on hormone synthesis and receptor pathways (pp. 22-28)
Science & Technology
Chemical educator and Compound Interest blogger Andy Brunning samples the ingredients and molecules that lend the cocktail flavorings their pungency (p.40)
Back Issues
 
Influenza antivirals to the rescue
When vaccines don’t perform, doctors turn to flu-fighting drugs to minimize the infection’s impact
(p.45)
Learning from the infamous 1918 Spanish flu
A century later, experts reflect on whether it could happen again
(p.46)
 

News of the Week

Interest in targeted protein degraders continues in new partnership between Celgene and Vividion

Vividion is using fragment-based screening to develop new drugs, including targeted protein degraders, for ‘undruggable’ proteins
(p.9)

Organometallic flow reaction reaches industrial scale

Chemists solve solubility problems to produce 100 kg of product
(p.10)

Tune in to the new episode of our podcast, Stereo Chemistry, as we discuss sexual harassment in chemistry

Learn what’s changed—and what hasn’t—in the months since C&EN published its cover story on the topic
(p.10)

Una reacción organometálica en flujo a escala industrial

Los químicos logran solucionar los problemas de solubilidad para producir 100 kilos de producto
(p.10)

Chemists break C–C bond record

New hydrocarbon compound contains a 1.806-Å-long bond that stretches beyond theoretical limit, researchers claim
(p.11)

Computer-designed reagent targets lysine for protein modification

Methylsulfonyl acrylate adds molecules to most reactive lysine in a protein
(p.13)

Care for a glass of fresh-brewed mammoth milk?

Firms are making milk and leather with yeast instead of animals
(p.16)

Lego plants to be made from plants

Danish firm adopts biobased polyethylene as a first step to phasing out fossil-fuel-derived polymers
(p.16)

Chemical industry slams Trump steel tariffs

Industry says moves to protect the U.S. steel and aluminum industries will hurt chemical makers
(p.17)
 

Departments

09611-polcon-drilling

Government & Policy

EPA ramps up efforts to create high-throughput approaches for screening chemical effects on hormone synthesis and receptor pathways
(pp. 22-28)

Science & Technology

Chemical educator and Compound Interest blogger Andy Brunning samples the ingredients and molecules that lend the cocktail flavorings their pungency
(p.40)
MIT materials engineer and entrepreneur will discuss innovative ways to harness bacteriophages during the ACS national meeting
(pp. 38-39)
Efforts to produce low-cost synthetic artemisinin gain momentum with help from Gates Foundation
(pp. 29-31)
Making a flu vaccine that will last longer than a season is a dream scientists have been chasing for years. Here’s how they’re working to make it a reality
(pp. 42-47)
When vaccines don’t perform, doctors turn to flu-fighting drugs to minimize the infection’s impact
(p.45)
A century later, experts reflect on whether it could happen again
(p.46)
Chemists use volatile organic compound analysis to assess how polymer-based art and artifacts are holding up
(p.14)
Cell surfaces are more natural than glass slides for identifying glycan-protein interactions
(p.14)
Pigment distribution points to light-sensitive regions of painting at higher risk of degradation
(p.15)
Novel python peptide has better drug properties than related mammalian antimicrobial peptides
(p.15)
High-temperature operation and tunability could bring microelectromechanical resonators to space and beyond
(p.15)